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A winter scene in the Dales. Looking towards Ingleborough from Sulber Nick. Climbs of Ingleborough start from Horton or Ribblehead. We run these walks throughout the year.

Wharton Hall in the valley visited on walks from Kirkby Stephen. A favourite venue for many easier walks.

 

 

Coach Walks 2007

 

21 January Hovingham, North Yorkshire
18 February Slaidburn, East Lancashire
18 March Fridaythorpe, East Yorkshire
15 April Greenfield, Greater Manchester
20 May Goathland, North Yorkshire
17 June Middleton-in-Teesdale, Durham
15 July Ambleside, Cumbria
19 August Saltburn, North Yorkshire
16 September Leyburn, North Yorkshire
14 October Holme, West Yorkshire
18 November Bolsterstone, South Yorkshire
16 December Whalley, East Lancashire

 

Whalley, Lancashire - 16 December

 

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 46K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 39K)



A WALK

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW THE PHOTOS

1. First ascent from Whalley
2. Crossing Wiswell Moor
3. Parsley Barn
4. Onwards & upwards around the Nick of Pendle
5. Above Churn Clough Reservoir
6. Craggs Dole Area
7. Nearing Deerstones
8. Levelling off at the top of the climb
9. Glancing across to Pendle Hill
10. Stile bashing Spence Moor
11. Lunch
12. Tricky descent
13. From Wood House to Dean Farm
14. Ascending to Padiham Heights
15. Padiham Heights with views back to the morning hills
16. Greetings from Read

Photos by Ian Hull

Off we shot like bullets from a gun up Clerk Hill to Wiswell Moor. At least the pace kept the cold out and we had fine views over Sabden and Churn Clough reservoir as we negotiated the Nick of Pendle and climbed to Spence Moor. No witches were flying but then it was probably too cold for them. No doubt they lurked somewhere in Well Wood where we sheltered for lunch. On to Read and the swollen River Calder where we began the serious trek back to base. There was, inevitably, a hill or two to help us on our way but we survived to sample the delights of Whalley - a choice of pubs and a very smart café. Thanks to the interchangeable leaders and our Will o' the Wisp backup. Thanks also to our own little dayglo glowworm who was better than a torch.

Report by Diane Exley


C WALK

1. Entering the grounds of Whalley Abbey
2. Taking on extra energy!!
3. River Calder, Whalley
4. Ascent of Clerk Hill
5. Wiswell Lane - Dicey Ice!!
6. Lunch "and my sandwich was this big"
7. Crossing Wilkin Heys
8. Ascent of 'Nick of Pendle'

The forecast sun never appeared, but 24 hardy 'C' walkers debussed in a cold and overcast Whalley, and, as the 'A's and 'B's shot off on their respective routes, the 'C's gently ambled to the "Cloisters Tea Rooms" in the grounds of Whalley Abbey. Bacon sandwiches, toasted teacakes, scones, tea and coffee were consumed at leisure. Eventually, reluctantly persuaded to leave by leader Glennys, off along the river Calder and up Clerk Hill, thank goodness for frozen ground, otherwise it would have been rather soggy. The ice patches along the lane below the radio mast had to negotiated with care. Lunch was taken in the lee of a dry stone wall and Glennys kindly passed round a large bag of chocolate filled biscuits. From the height of Nick of Pendle the overcast and haze marred what would obviously been stunning views on a clear day. From here it was virtually all down hill, passing through the pretty village of Pendleton, admiring the luxury housing development on the outskirts of Wiswell and back to Whalley. A very pleasant end to the day was had in "The Dog Inn" and tea shops. A most enjoyable walk despite the poor weather. Many thanks to Glennys and her trusty back up, Sue.

Photos and report by Trevor Grimston

 

 

Bolsterstone, South Yorkshire - 18 November

 

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 46K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 117K)

A WALK

The weather lady told us not to get out of bed and, if we did, not to go out. We ignored both warnings. 'A' party set off in fine fettle from Penistone station, the wind and rain whistling in our ears. (The promised sun had already faded)After a flattish start we were soon scaling the heights of Black Moor and experiencing the first snows of the year. Plunging down to the A616 we once more waved goodbye to the plains and clambered to Whitwell Moor. Bolsterstone was but a stone's throw away but, like the troopers we are, we steadfastly walked or rather ran away from it. Through woods, fields and meadows and over a large variety of very dodgy stiles, we made our way to High Bradfield and then to Edge Mount where the 360 degree views of mist and snow were literally breathtaking. Spout House hill and a wander in the woods brought us to the climax of our walk - the final hill. Final because it finished us off but did bring us to the warmth of the pub where our companions hailed us as the lost tribe. Thank you Christina and David for an ambitious and interesting walk. Let's do it in the sunshine next time!

Report by Diane Exley

C WALK

One thing's for certain, the Twydales are consistent with their walks in the rain!
After our usual coffee stop, with toasted teacakes nearly the size of dinner plates, we set off from Langsett, over stiles, through fields and forest paths on what would have been a lovely walk in fine weather. Lunch was taken by the boathouse of an activity centre at the side of the reservoir though not much shelter was provided so we didn't dawdle too long before setting off again towards our destination. We had to pass through a herd of cows with some calves and they weren't very happy to see us tramping across their field. Some of our group were quite nervous of a possible attack as the cows came closer and closer in an attempt to warn us off but thanks to the 'Farmer Joe' efforts of Stuart and Trevor we got through unscathed and the cows soon lost interest. As the rain got heavier our leaders made an executive decision to cut out a section of the walk and got us back to the pub in Bolsterstone very early!! Much appreciated.
Despite the weather we did enjoy the walk and thank Stuart and Paddy for their leadership and especially for the early finish!

Report by Joan Thompson

 

 

Holme, West Yorkshire - 14 October

 

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Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 30K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 114K)

 

A WALK

'A' party alighted at Holmfirth and we were soon attacking our first vertical ascent on the way to the hamlet of Netherthong. A very pleasant path was then followed and we were lulled into an easygoing saunter. This was not to last. The word 'yomping' floated at the back of our minds and, having enjoyed our coffee and found another wide, even path, we were suddenly diverted into vertical yomping stance. Minds were concentrated and feet carefully placed and after a stop for lunch below the Holme Moss transmitter, we all arrived safe and sound beside the A6024. Holme was in sight but a direct route was not planned. We explored the wonder of Ramsden Clough, took our tea on Cook's Study Hill and finally wended our way steadily uphill to reach the comfort of the Fleece at Holme. A splendid walk admirably led by our yomping expert and his faithful backup. Many thanks to Brian and Penny.

Report by Diane Exley

 

 

Leyburn, North Yorkshire - 16 September

(Photo above, Ian Hull)

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 28K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 86K)

 

A WALK

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1. Aysgarth
2. Lower Falls Aysgarth
3. Ascending from Carperby
4. Above Carperby looking across to Pen Hill
5. To Castle Bolton
6. Bolton Castle
7. St. Oswald's Church, Castle Bolton
8. Sheltering At Cobscar

Photos by Ian Hull



B WALK

A very select and discriminating group set forth upon the 'B' walk. Starting from West Burton and stopping only to admire the waterfall, we then tackled the slopes of Burton Moor with gusto, not to say heavy breathing, and were rewarded by splendid views. A little mist on the horizon did not dim our pleasure as we continued to the former site of Penhill Quarry where we had lunch. By this time the wind was really making itself felt and we flew to the safer ground of Middleham High Moor, trying to rescue escaped sheep on the way. Weaving through trail bikes enlivened the descent to the river but we were rewarded at Wensley by drinks all round from our sexagenarian backup. This refreshment enabled us to stumble across the fields to the delights of Leyburn. A lovely walk in almost pleasant weather. Thanks to the leader and backup.

Report by Diane Exley

 

C WALK

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW THE PHOTOS

 
9. Leyburn Shawl
10. Descent to Bolton Hall
11. Lunch, Wensley
12. Wensley Parish Church
13. River Ure path (1)
14. River Ure path (2)
15. Afternoon tea break
16. Approaching Middleham Bridge
17. Last lap to Leyburn

Arriving in Leyburn in good time, the weather bright and dry but with a chilly breeze, the 'C' party had to wait nearly 10 minutes for "The Posthorn Café" to open. Suitably fortified by tea, coffee, bacon sandwiches, toasted tea cakes and scones (could this be the reason for the increase in 'C'walkers?), we duly set off along Leyburn Shawl. This ridge allows superb views of Wensleydale and today, a spectacular view of a squall over Penhill. On the open stretch before the path went through the trees, a gale force wind was blowing up from the valley. Dropping down out of the trees, a very nasty stile, leaning with the slope, proved rather difficult. Continuing along field paths, over the railway and through the grounds of Bolton Hall, passing its splendid house, partially rebuilt after a fire in 1902. Lunch was taken in Wensley, where a low wall round a large tree on the green, provided enough room for all 20 members to sit in reasonable comfort. Leaving Wensley, in glorious hot sunshine, passing the parish church, considered by many one of the finest in the Dales, we crossed the River Ure and followed the river downstream to the spectacular Middleham Bridge, slung between two pairs of sham medieval towers. Field paths led back to Leyburn, with some light rain blowing in the wind. Here, the group split up to find their choice of watering hole. A lovely, gentle walk in mainly pleasant weather. Many thanks to our leaders, Margaret and Joan.

Report and photos by Trevor Grimston

 

 

Saltburn, North Yorkshire - 19 August

C WALK

Just like the pop group it was Wet! Wet! Wet! with non-existent views due to the mist, although our leaders kept assuring us 'the views were good' (they'd reccied in the sun!). In spite of this the walk was a good one along the Cleveland Way taking us through Guisborough Forest where we had to be on the alert so we weren't mown down by the scramble bikes charging in and out of the trees. We followed the Way through fields towards Skelton before dropping down to Saltburn where the sea was just visible through the haze. Three of the group were hardy enough to have a brief walk along the prom before joining the rest of us for a very welcome hot cuppa. Stuart and Paddy earned our thanks for what was, despite the weather, a lovely walk.  

Report by Joan Thompson

 

 

Ambleside, Cumbria - 15 July

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 31K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 102K)

 

C WALK

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW THE PHOTOS

1. Pier Head, Ambleside
2. Setting Off
3. Miller Brow Climb
4. View of Fairfield Horseshoe
5. On Flanks of Loughrigg Fell
6. View of Langdale Fells
7. Loughrigg Terrace
8. Rydal Water
9. The Tricky Bit, Rydal Water
10. Crossing River Rothay

Arriving in Ambleside in glorious sunshine and debussing at the Pier Head, the 'C' party, naturally, made their way into the Pier Head Café. Suitably fortified with tea and toast, it was off, led by Joan and backed up by Margaret, on a very pleasant walk of mixed going with superb views at all times and although the weather looked like breaking after mid day, it fortunately came to no more than a few drops towards the finish. Round the bottom of the town and through the church yard. Flat going so far, but this is the 'Lakes' and it soon proved its point with a heavy breathing slog up Miller Brow, but worth it , with superb view of Fairfield Horseshoe and adjacent fells. Lunch was taken on the flanks of Loughrigg Fell, looking out over Lake Windermere. We meandered past Loughrigg Tarn, down through the woods and on to Loughrigg Terrace above Lake Grasmere, alongside Rydal Water (with a bit of tricky rock climbing), through Rydal Park and so back to a choice of refreshments in Ambleside. Many thanks to Joan and Margaret.

Photos and report by Trevor Grimston

 

 

Middleton-in-Teesdale - 17 June

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Walk descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 28K)

Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 67K)

 

A WALK

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1. High Force
2. Low Force

Photos by Moya McNamara

Given the deluges which had fallen during the week the clouds scudding across the skies as we approached our destination gave cause for concern. The River Tees was buoyant as we clambered along its banks and tricky beck crossings were promised for later. However, with admirable judgement, our leader diverted us from a watery grave and led us to the fantastic spectacle of High Force in full spate. Safely crossing the river we passed through Newbiggin and climbed the grassy fields and conquered the second class yomping to descend through an undulating wood to the very welcome teashop which was still open. A lovely walk despite the uncertain weather. Well-led in difficult circumstances. Thanks to David and Carola.

Report by Diane Exley

 

C WALK

On what turned out to be the wettest walk we've had in ages we set off along the highways and byways around Middleton, after our morning coffee of course. Passing through Aukside and across Tinkers Allotment we then stopped for lunch, unbeknownst to us, in a field with a herd of cows with calves hiding in a hollow. When they realised there were intruders in the area, they gradually worked their way nearer and nearer towards us. Some of the group fled over the wall thinking they were going to get stampeded. Eventually when the cows got too close for comfort, Trevor decided to do his 'Farmer Joe' act and shooed them off so we could finish our lunch in peace. Continuing of our way we descended into Newbiggin then along the riverside back into Middleton. We gave our legs plenty of extra exercise climbing over the numerous stiles (we stopped counting at 28!!), one of the hazards of staying in the valleys to do a supposedly easy walk! Unfortunately, the weather spoiled the views but it was a lovely walk in a lovely area. Stuart and Paddy decided they aren't leading any more walks with 'Middle' in the name as they led the 'Middle'ham walk a while back in torrential rain and now 'Middle'ton, thanks to them anyway, they really couldn't help the weather.

Report by Joan Thompson


 

 

Goathland, North Yorkshire - 20 May

(Photo above: Mallyon Spout - Ian Hull)

A WALK

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1. Hole of Horcum
2. Starting High
3. Above the forest across NYM Railway
4. Simon Howe Trig Point
5. Across Howe Moor
6. Another strenuous DalesRail Sunday afternoon
7. North Yorkshire Moors Railway
8. Beck Hole
9. To Mallyon Spout
10. Mallyon Spout
11. The Last Up Into Goathland

Photos by Ian Hull


'A' party started and finished on a high but there was a variety of terrain inbetween. Plunging from the Hole of Horcum we had soon crossed the NY Moors Railway line and sped up through the forest to Wardle Green. Simon Howe beckoned next and penalties were incurred by those who did not touch the summit cairn. A stroll across Howl Moor and a close encounter with a Roman Road brought us to Hazel Heads. After a further struggle to gain height we lost it again as we descended to the delightful hamlet of Beck Hole. Nearly there, but the worst was yet to come with a seemingly unending staircase of steps which eventually led us to the magnificent sight of Mallyon Spout and thence to Goathland. A wonderful walk with constantly changing scenery, good leadership and pleasant company. Thanks to Sylvia and John.

Report by Diane Exley

 

C WALK

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12. Descent to Darnholm
13. Darnholm
14. Heading towards Beck Hole
15. Beck Hole
16. The Goathland Rail Trail
17. The Steps!!
18. Mallyon Spout
19. North York Moors Railway
20. The old and new to the moors
21. Goathland Station

A most enjoyable 'C' ability ramble with touches of 'A'!! Led by Norman and backed up by a hastily co-opted Angela, we set off in perfect walking weather - mild/warm, sunshine, a nice breeze and crystal clear views. Starting from the C.P. in Goathland, we descended to the "N.Y. Moors Railway" station, about ½ a mile, for a rest, coffee, scones, toast etc. Suitably vitaled, a steep climb and an equally steep descent to Darnholm, a picturesque hamlet with a ford and stepping stones. A further ascent to open land gave superb views in all directions. Down, again, into the pretty village of Beck Hole, along a the "Goathland Rail Trail" and lunch. More ups and downs along the riverside, with a short diversion over tricky rocks and boulders, to view the "Mallyon Spout " waterfall. A further steep climb, this time stepped, and back into Goathland, (but not the end) and a visit to the ice cream van. Leaving the village again, across fields, to pick up a long, straight stretch of disused railway track, (they're all over the place!), to Moorgates, with an excellent view of a passing steam train. Passing under the line, we turned for "home", the pleasure of seeing two steam trains in Goathland Station and the liquid delights of "the Aidensfield Arms". Many thanks to Norman and Angela. (A walk that could be described in broad Yorkshire "as reet up an' darn do")

Report and photos by Trevor Grimston


Greenfield, Greater Manchester - 15 April

(Photo above: Dovestone Reservoir - Ian Hull)

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walks Descriptions (Microsoft Word document, 30K)

Walks Sketch map (Adobe PDF document, 93K)

A WALK

Photos

1. Ascending from Pobgreen
2. To the Obelisk
3. Alderman's Hill
4. Yeoman Hey Reservoir
5. En route to Birchen Clough
6. Birchen Clough 1
7. Birchen Clough 2
8. Birchen Clough 3
9. Above Birchen Clough - Near Ashway Stone
10. View across to Dovestone Reservoir
11. Ascending around Dove Stone Moss
12. To Alphin Pike
13. Descending to Greenfield

Photos by Ian Hull

Summer had arrived as we ploughed our way up to the strangely-named 'Pots and Pans' rocks from Uppermill. Plunging down to Dovestone Reservoir one of our party was adopted by a wayward lamb but was soon firmly shown the error of its ways. A period of welcome flatness took us round Yeoman Hay Reservoir and then it was an interesting scramble by the waterfall to the far reaches of Birchen Clough. An exhilarating walk along the edge led us to Chew Reservoir. Continuing to follow the edge we yomped and stumbled up to Alphin Pike. As our leader said the rest was pretty well downhill but only pretty well! A final quiet walk by the canal brought us to Greenfield and the tea-making expertise at the local pub. An outstandingly good walk in magnificent scenery. Thanks to Martin and Yvonne for their hard work.

Report by Diane Exley

B WALK or NOT THE A WALK

Birchen Clough (see A walk) has long since been a particular nemesis of mine. When I first scrambled up it about ten years ago, I stubbed my toe, near the top of the Clough but had come too far up to go back down so I had to limp across the tops to Ashway Stone and then beat a (not too hasty) retreat back down to the car park. Five years ago, I led Burnley & Pendle ramblers up the clough and was so careful helping people across the stream below the waterfall that I slipped and fell in the stream myself, luckily injuring nothing but my pride. It was with a degree of trepidation that I approached it again on Good Friday this year to do the reccy for the B walk, but since I was last up there, I saw there had been a few more rock slides and parts of the path had dropped away so although I actually made it up the clough unscathed on the reccy, I was not convinced the same would be said of the our intrepid B party, so we opted for an easier approach up the old quarry road from Dovestone Reservoir itself to Chew Reservoir (sometimes known locally as the reservoir in the clouds by virtue of its height). Chatting to the participants on the walk, I think I made the right decision.

An early start allowed us a leisurely circuit of Dovestone reservoir, morning coffee at the bottom of the road, lunch at the top and then a pleasant afternoon stroll along Hoarstone Edge with two further stops at the rocks and at the trig point. As promised we did see lots of planes passing overhead. It was unfortunately too hazy for far distant views, but it was still possible to see of Greenfield, the reservoirs in the valley and the foothills of the Peak District, whilst Oldham, Manchester and the West Pennine Moors remained obscured. A steady descent led us to the last mile along the Huddersfield Narrow Canal where we saw a variety of wild life before reaching the Railway pub where beer, burgers, cups of tea and music awaited us.

Report by Philip Birtwistle

C WALK

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW THE PHOTOS

14. Start of Walk
15. Climb to the "Coffee Van"
16. Dovestone Reservoir
17. Alderman's Hill from Dovestone Reservoir
18. Starting up the Chew Brook Valley
19. Looking down Chew Brook Valley
20. Start of return leg
21. Dovestone Reservoir & Alderman's Hill
22. Afternoon break on "Oldham Way"
23. Last lap along the canal

Photos by Trevor Grimston

Who would have thought the outskirts of Manchester could be so lovely! (although it was pretty close to Yorkshire too).

Setting off from Dovestone Reservoir at 9.30 a.m. in glorious sunshine we gently traversed round the reservoir then had our coffee stop at a customised Cafe Van in the Bin Gill car park, no bacon butties or toasted teacakes but it was a lovely cup of coffee. Suitably refreshed we headed back down to the reservoir where we had an uphill stretch along Chew Road, we gained a bit of shade through Chew Piece Plantation and had a leisurely lunch stop sunbathing at the side of Chew Brook. Continuing along part of the Oldham Way we had another short climb along the moor edge before dropping down to the Tame Valley Way and along the canal back into Greenfield with the very welcoming pub and much appreciated liquid refreshment. The views were spectacular all day though the heat haze marred long distance. This was a lovely walk (a gently stroll really due to the early start) in a lovely previously unvisited area. Many thanks to Chris and Brian, our able leaders.

Report by Joan Thompson

 

Fridaythorpe, East Yorkshire - 18 March

(Photo above, Trevor Grimston)

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk Descriptions (Microsoft Word file, 29K)

Walks Sketch Map (Adobe PDF file, 41K)

A WALK

The weather was a kaleidoscope of changing patterns as we made our way to the Yorkshire Wolds. Hot sun, strong cold winds and sharp bursts of stinging hail accompanied us as we swung from Kirby Underdale over to great Givendale and Millington. Sylvan Dale turned out to be the precursor to a very steep climb into Nettle Dale. But we recovered sufficiently to conquer Frendal Dale and Tun Dale before lighting upon the very welcome settlement of Fridaythorpe where we partook of some much-needed refreshment. Luckily the weather did not prevent us from having spectacular views and the wind didn't quite blow us away. A very enjoyable and well-led walk. Thanks to Moya and Mike.

Report by "Sticks" Exley

C WALK

After partaking of our usual morning feast (even some 'B' party members are now starting to join us for this), we eventually set off to do battle with the wind. Apart from one sharp snow shower before lunch the weather turned pleasant and the walk was good. The majority of the walk was on solid paths so no bogs or muddy boots! We were all glad to get back to the cafe and out of that cold wind. Thanks to Chris and Brian for a lovely walk in a favourite area.

Report by Joan Thompson

After an enforced circuitous route due to the bridge at Stanford Bridge being closed, and down narrow country lanes that had probably never seen a motor coach, the 'C' party finally debussed at Fridaythorpe, high on the Yorkshire Wolds. It was almost a race to the "Seaways Café" as another coach load of walkers were heading in the same direction! With typical 'C' walkers determination they beat them to it. Suitably nourished by tea, toast and tea cakes, we were off. Leaving the village, in bright sunshine, along a track, we descended into the attractive and unusual Holme Dale and along Harper Dale. On the track leading to Northfield House Farm, the very cold wind blew up a vicious hail storm - forecast right for once! Lunch was taken in the pretty village of Huggate, with, for once, benches to sit on, and a visit to the delightful nearby church. A steady walk up to and past Glebe Farm, brought us to a point were unusually all three walks crossed. From here it was on to the open wolds and into a cold gale force wind. A 'coffee' stop at Wold House Farm, then across more wind swept fields, albeit giving long distant views, a 'big sky', and back to Fridaythorpe. Most of the group made their way to the café, while the rest braved the "Farmers Arms", heaving with "Mothers Day" parties and screaming children! A very pleasant, gentle walk and many thanks to the leaders, Chris and Brian.

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW THE PHOTOS

1. The Start
2. Descent into Holme Dale
3. Holme Dale
4. Entering Harper Dale
5. Harper Dale
6. Twixt Northfield House and Huggate
7. Approaching Huggate
8. Huggate Church
9. Leaving Huggate
10. Above the Wolds
11. The Big Sky
12. The Last Lap

Additional Report and photos by Trevor Grimston

 

 

Slaidburn, Lancs - 18 February

(Photo above, Trevor Grimston)

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walk Descriptions (Microsoft Word file, 31K)

Walks Sketch Map (Adobe PDF file, 111K)

A WALK

Photos

1. Lunch above Croasdale
2. Gisburn Forest
3. Stocks Reservoir

Photos by Moya McNamara

C WALK

Photos

5. Riverbank Tearooms
6. Leaving Slaidburn
7. Descent to Shay House
8. Croasdale House
9. The New Stile!!
10. The Nasty Gulley
11. Descent to Stocks Reservoir
12. Afternoon Tea
13. Descent to Slaidburn

After a meandering journey (apparently the coach could not negotiate the venues bridge), all 3 groups debussed at Slaidburn. The weather was dry, mild and sunny with the prospect of a good days walking. As usual, the 'C' got their priorities right, made straight for the "River Bank Tea Rooms" and, suitably fortified by tea and scones, finally set off, led by Joan and backed up by Margaret. The route passed over undulating soggy fields with seemingly endless stiles, both wooden and stone, but any inconvenience was eradicated by the superb views in all directions. A stile, not there two weeks ago, made access from one field much easier! Lunch was taken by a beck, were the present political situation was vigorously (and loudly) debated at length. A nasty muddy gulley had to be negotiated and on the descent to Stocks Reservoir, more stunning views, leading to a pleasant walk along the reservoir shore and across the huge earth reservoir dam. The last lap was down a lane, passing the well preserved Elizabethan "Hammerton Hall", crossing fields, back to Slaidburn. Some members stopped at the river to wash their boots, splitting into two groups, the "teas" and the "beers" A very enjoyable day in lovely weather with exceptional views. Many thanks to Joan and Margaret.

Report and photos by Trevor Grimston

 

 

 

Hovingham, North Yorkshire - 21 January

(Photo above, Trevor Grimston)

PLEASE CLICK THE LINKS BELOW TO VIEW

Walks Descriptions (Microsoft Word file, 29K)

Walks Sketch Map (Adobe PDF file, 28K)

C Walk

Photos

1. Ready for off
2. Typical field conditions
3. Firm going at last
4. Slingsby Church
5. Lunch venue
6. Nearly at the ridge
7. Slingsby Banks Wood
8. Afternoon Tea
9. Return to Hovingham

After the gales and torrential rain of the previous few days, the gods were good, and Sunday turned out mild and dry with hazy sunshine. After dropping the 'A' and 'B ' groups, the 'C's finally debussed in the picturesque village of Hovingham, with its "olde worlde" houses and cottages gathered round the imposing gateway to the Hovingham Estate. As usual, the 'C's had their priorities right and all 22 made their way to "The Spa Tea Rooms", completely filling the its two small rooms. Suitably vitalled, we set off along tracks (one, a long abandoned railway) and across muddy fields (not as bad as expected), to take lunch on The Green in the charming village of Slingsby. From here, a gentle ascent up Slingsby Heights to the ridge at Slingsby Banks wood. From here, a superb panoramic view of the North Yorks Moors, and the Vale of Pickering, a vast lake in glacial times. The track now followed the wooded ridge, with one horrendous 40-50 yard stretch of boot topping mud! "Afternoon Tea" was taken in a large clearing of felled trees, each member sitting on their own stump. The sight resembling the gnome section of a garden centre! Out of the woods, across some fields and the descent back to Hovingham. The fast flowing ford by the tea rooms was a godsend for cleaning mud laden boots and those with long handled pan scrubs were very popular!! With suitably clean footwear, it was into the welcoming bar of "The Malt Shovel". A most enjoyable, undemanding walk with time to admire the scenery. Many thanks to Glennys, ably backed up by Pat.

Report and photos by Trevor Grimston